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destinee1997:

Anna and the French Kiss quotes ♥

But I loved the library simply because it was a library. I love libraries. I like reading, but I love libraries. Being surrounded by books makes me feel safe, the way some people need trees or mountains around them to feel secure. Not me – nature’s not what I cling to. I cling to books.

austriajumarang:

Quote from Back When You Were Easier to Love by Emily Wing Smith. (via booksdirect)


My Love Affair with the Library

It’s not as scandalous as it sounds (if only right?!…right?). My relationship with libraries spans about 15-16 years, roughly. 
It began in elementary school. I attended a newly rebuilt school (my sister went to the old ugly one, haha!). It was ‘L’ or boomerang shaped. Or is. It is, because it’s still there. At the center, at it’s core, lies a circular lobby type thing leading to the library. The elementary school library was at the center of the school and it was the first thing you saw when you entered through the main entrance doors. 
Now, when it comes to libraries (and rooms in general), you get a sense of belonging, etc. based on the comfortableness of the area. The only way I could describe my elementary school library is ‘warm’. The windows always let in a warm sunny light. The colors ran through the orange pallet, ranging from yellows, reds, and browns. The shelves were always pristine and the tables and chairs were so blocky it felt like putting a jigsaw puzzle together. But I loved those tables. I loved those shelves. I loved the small auditorium seating (of two rows) in the corner where our library would sit us down for story time until we were in six grade!
Libraries are important and so are the teachers who use them. 
I was sad when I went off to middle school. I never got the chance to read all the books I was able too in elementary school, but moving on to middle school introduced me to a new set of books. New reading levels. New genres. New people. 
There was a new librarian and she was mean, but in the most reasonable way possible. At some point in my middle school career our librarian began a new reading system/club where students could sign up, read a book, and essentially review the book. If we read, reviewed, and the review was good enough we got a free book. (I think we had to read at least five books or something). I was sold. Middle school helped garner my love for reading. The librarian placed the books in my hands and let me run wild with them. Middle school was actually the first time I remember ever going through the aisles and running my fingers across the spines of those books, searching for my next read. 
I never said thank you to that librarian. I must have annoyed her so much, but not as much as I probably annoyed the librarian at my high school. 
High school was a whole different story. When I entered the Media Center (it was media center now, not library…) I knew that I was going to spend the next four years of my life in that building. And I did *shrugs*. A lot of people did. I’m not the only one. A third of my class spent their mornings and afternoons in that building. There was two computer labs. Two rows of tables with less than comfortable seats and shelves running from one side of the room to the other and shelves lining the walls. 
The media center was a fun place to be. My high school had a arts department and a lot of times their artwork would be on display in the lobby leading into the library and in the library itself, along the windows and on the shelves. Every holiday season the individual teacher teams would make gingerbread houses and students got to vote whose was the best. The whole month of December smelled so delicious. 
Unlike, conventional libraries, etc. My high school library was always loud. That’s probably why the librarian hated us (and probably other students too). It was quiet up to a point. Me and my group of friends would get kicked out at least once a week, but not banned (thank god). 
I was so grateful for that building. It was the place I went to early in the morning, straight off the school bus. I spent almost an hour every morning in there. I think I checked out at least half the books in there. There was the best ‘new books’ shelves at the entrance. It was the first thing I came across before running off to my table to read before my friends arrived. 
The librarian (although she was so annoyed), didn’t mind my constant appearance at her checkout desk. She humored me when I asked her questions or talked about the books. She gave me free book marks (all of which I still have today). And they had that super fun system where they stamped the due date in the opening cover. 
I was sad when the librarian retired. I never thought I’d be sad. We drove each other crazy, but nonetheless, I was sad. 
The last day of senior year was the worst. Signing yearbooks, taking pictures, saying goodbye to friends and favorite teachers. It was bittersweet, but the school was changing and so was I. It hurt. I had grown so attached to that building, that room, that table, and those books. 
The library was my sanctuary in every sense that it made me feel happy and let me have fun with my friends and classmates. 
I’ve since moved on from public school libraries. College is a whole different affair. The community college I currently attend has a beautiful structure with skylights that let in natural light and echo when the rain hits it. It also has a large selection of artwork and sculptures. 
I’ve spent many a days lounging around that college library. It’s only place I feel safe, because it’s the only place I’ve ever really known (and it’s quiet). 
A few blocks away is the public library of Glendale. It’s on the Saguaro Park conservation and a botanical garden surrounds it. When I’m up for it, I walk from school to the public library. I walk past these large iron gates and walk across dirt paths. 
The public library also has an amazing skylight. I suppose living in Arizona does have it’s perks. They’re constantly revamping themselves to appeal to their patrons. They have endless amounts of new books and a book sale section with books selling from $5 and less. I’d also like to mention their library cards I super cute. 
I visit almost every other week. I can’t imagine how nice it is to work in a field where you get a sense of peace and comfort knowing you can see ‘regular patrons’ or helping others out when need be. 
The library offers a great deal of comfort and self worth. 
For me, that time of moving along and leaving has come again. I’m leaving my college for good. I’m leaving this public library for good and hopefully to a new one that I would equally love. Goodbyes are hard and sometimes quite devastating. 
But in a sense, I never truly leave those libraries. They were and are a part of me just as much as anything else is. They nurtured me and gave me precious memories I’ll treasure forever. One library will push me into another one, because you can’t keep me out of the library. I don’t think I’ll be able to stop being a patron of the library. It’s too good to pass up. 
They’re a part of me that I’ll never give up.
So, let the love affair continue. 
- Samantha 

My Love Affair with the Library

It’s not as scandalous as it sounds (if only right?!…right?). My relationship with libraries spans about 15-16 years, roughly. 

It began in elementary school. I attended a newly rebuilt school (my sister went to the old ugly one, haha!). It was ‘L’ or boomerang shaped. Or is. It is, because it’s still there. At the center, at it’s core, lies a circular lobby type thing leading to the library. The elementary school library was at the center of the school and it was the first thing you saw when you entered through the main entrance doors. 

Now, when it comes to libraries (and rooms in general), you get a sense of belonging, etc. based on the comfortableness of the area. The only way I could describe my elementary school library is ‘warm’. The windows always let in a warm sunny light. The colors ran through the orange pallet, ranging from yellows, reds, and browns. The shelves were always pristine and the tables and chairs were so blocky it felt like putting a jigsaw puzzle together. But I loved those tables. I loved those shelves. I loved the small auditorium seating (of two rows) in the corner where our library would sit us down for story time until we were in six grade!

Libraries are important and so are the teachers who use them. 

I was sad when I went off to middle school. I never got the chance to read all the books I was able too in elementary school, but moving on to middle school introduced me to a new set of books. New reading levels. New genres. New people. 

There was a new librarian and she was mean, but in the most reasonable way possible. At some point in my middle school career our librarian began a new reading system/club where students could sign up, read a book, and essentially review the book. If we read, reviewed, and the review was good enough we got a free book. (I think we had to read at least five books or something). I was sold. Middle school helped garner my love for reading. The librarian placed the books in my hands and let me run wild with them. Middle school was actually the first time I remember ever going through the aisles and running my fingers across the spines of those books, searching for my next read. 

I never said thank you to that librarian. I must have annoyed her so much, but not as much as I probably annoyed the librarian at my high school. 

High school was a whole different story. When I entered the Media Center (it was media center now, not library…) I knew that I was going to spend the next four years of my life in that building. And I did *shrugs*. A lot of people did. I’m not the only one. A third of my class spent their mornings and afternoons in that building. There was two computer labs. Two rows of tables with less than comfortable seats and shelves running from one side of the room to the other and shelves lining the walls. 

The media center was a fun place to be. My high school had a arts department and a lot of times their artwork would be on display in the lobby leading into the library and in the library itself, along the windows and on the shelves. Every holiday season the individual teacher teams would make gingerbread houses and students got to vote whose was the best. The whole month of December smelled so delicious. 

Unlike, conventional libraries, etc. My high school library was always loud. That’s probably why the librarian hated us (and probably other students too). It was quiet up to a point. Me and my group of friends would get kicked out at least once a week, but not banned (thank god). 

I was so grateful for that building. It was the place I went to early in the morning, straight off the school bus. I spent almost an hour every morning in there. I think I checked out at least half the books in there. There was the best ‘new books’ shelves at the entrance. It was the first thing I came across before running off to my table to read before my friends arrived. 

The librarian (although she was so annoyed), didn’t mind my constant appearance at her checkout desk. She humored me when I asked her questions or talked about the books. She gave me free book marks (all of which I still have today). And they had that super fun system where they stamped the due date in the opening cover. 

I was sad when the librarian retired. I never thought I’d be sad. We drove each other crazy, but nonetheless, I was sad. 

The last day of senior year was the worst. Signing yearbooks, taking pictures, saying goodbye to friends and favorite teachers. It was bittersweet, but the school was changing and so was I. It hurt. I had grown so attached to that building, that room, that table, and those books. 

The library was my sanctuary in every sense that it made me feel happy and let me have fun with my friends and classmates. 

I’ve since moved on from public school libraries. College is a whole different affair. The community college I currently attend has a beautiful structure with skylights that let in natural light and echo when the rain hits it. It also has a large selection of artwork and sculptures. 

I’ve spent many a days lounging around that college library. It’s only place I feel safe, because it’s the only place I’ve ever really known (and it’s quiet). 

A few blocks away is the public library of Glendale. It’s on the Saguaro Park conservation and a botanical garden surrounds it. When I’m up for it, I walk from school to the public library. I walk past these large iron gates and walk across dirt paths. 

The public library also has an amazing skylight. I suppose living in Arizona does have it’s perks. They’re constantly revamping themselves to appeal to their patrons. They have endless amounts of new books and a book sale section with books selling from $5 and less. I’d also like to mention their library cards I super cute. 

I visit almost every other week. I can’t imagine how nice it is to work in a field where you get a sense of peace and comfort knowing you can see ‘regular patrons’ or helping others out when need be. 

The library offers a great deal of comfort and self worth. 

For me, that time of moving along and leaving has come again. I’m leaving my college for good. I’m leaving this public library for good and hopefully to a new one that I would equally love. Goodbyes are hard and sometimes quite devastating. 

But in a sense, I never truly leave those libraries. They were and are a part of me just as much as anything else is. They nurtured me and gave me precious memories I’ll treasure forever. One library will push me into another one, because you can’t keep me out of the library. I don’t think I’ll be able to stop being a patron of the library. It’s too good to pass up. 

They’re a part of me that I’ll never give up.

So, let the love affair continue. 

- Samantha 

Tuesday! Send me your Library Confessions or Stories. OR why not post your own and share with #nlw14 and #LivesChange 
Let’s continue to support our libraries.
If you’re interested in submitting a library confession (aka confessions of a libraryaholic) send it here.
I’m writing a super long post for this write now. I should be done with it soon…hopefully.
Also, PSA - I wanted to let you guys know (If it wasn’t obvious before), I’m changing my library meme from ‘Confessions of a Libraryaholic’ to just ‘Library Confessions’. It’s shorter, rolls of the tongue, and doesn’t have an angry red squiggly underneath it. Thanks!
- samreads

Tuesday! Send me your Library Confessions or Stories. OR why not post your own and share with #nlw14 and #LivesChange 

Let’s continue to support our libraries.

If you’re interested in submitting a library confession (aka confessions of a libraryaholic) send it here.

I’m writing a super long post for this write now. I should be done with it soon…hopefully.

Also, PSA - I wanted to let you guys know (If it wasn’t obvious before), I’m changing my library meme from ‘Confessions of a Libraryaholic’ to just ‘Library Confessions’. It’s shorter, rolls of the tongue, and doesn’t have an angry red squiggly underneath it. Thanks!

- samreads

mugglenet:

Happy birthday to Emma Thompson, who played Professor Trelawney!

riddlemetom:

Emma Watson, April 15 1990

The first people a dictator puts in jail after a coup are the writers, the teachers, the librarians — because these people are dangerous. They have enough vocabulary to recognize injustice and to speak out loudly about it. Let us have the courage to go on being dangerous people.

- Dare to Disturb the Universe: Madeleine L’Engle on Creativity, Censorship, Writing, and the Duty of Children’s Books | Brain Pickings (via thingspeopleasklibrarians)

blackballoonpublishing:

There’s a secret branch of the New York Public Library in the subway. The 51st Street 6 line subway station is home to the Terence Cardinal Cooke-Cathedral branch of the New York Public Library. Librarians at the location report that they’re usually visited by the same partons, frequent commuters who are looking for something to read during their daily train ride. Like all New York librarians, though, they’re happy to answer research questions — usually about how to work the Metrocard machine. The library is currently closed for repairs, but you can visit it when it reopens in September if you need a good book for your ride home … or need to figure out how to get home.KEEP READING: "Celebrate National Library Week with 10 WTF Facts About New York City Libraries"

blackballoonpublishing:

There’s a secret branch of the New York Public Library in the subway.

The 51st Street 6 line subway station is home to the Terence Cardinal Cooke-Cathedral branch of the New York Public Library. Librarians at the location report that they’re usually visited by the same partons, frequent commuters who are looking for something to read during their daily train ride. Like all New York librarians, though, they’re happy to answer research questions — usually about how to work the Metrocard machine. The library is currently closed for repairs, but you can visit it when it reopens in September if you need a good book for your ride home … or need to figure out how to get home.

KEEP READING: "Celebrate National Library Week with 10 WTF Facts About New York City Libraries"

My relationship with my followers

  • Me: ask me anything guys, nothing is off the limits.
  • Followers:
  • Me:
  • Followers:
  • Me: okay, I'll just reblog some pictures.

Day 16- A series you wish more people would have read

His Dark Materials

“Without stories, we wouldn’t be human beings at all”

(Source: khaleesipotter)

openbooksorg:

In 2006, a high school English teacher had her students write to famous authors attempting to persuade them to visit the school. Only one author responded - Kurt Vonnegut. 

openbooksorg:

In 2006, a high school English teacher had her students write to famous authors attempting to persuade them to visit the school. Only one author responded - Kurt Vonnegut. 

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Monday didn’t have a set theme. So, today I decided to talk about the libraries I would like to visit sometime in the future. 

1. Library of Congress, Washington D.C., USAimage

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It’s beautiful and is the largest library in the world. Can you imagine being a librarian at the Library of Congress? OMG, that would be heaven. (image source)

2. Burton Barr Library, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

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Local pride! I’ve been here before…but only once! Sadly, considering I live here. Burton Barr is so beautiful and the architecture is so interesting. My favorite detail are the glass elevators. The teen reading room has a large projection screen for movie nights and an equally large reading selection. They also have a large selection of foreign language books (which I thought was awesome). (image source). 

3. Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan

image

image

I have a strong feeling that if I were to travel the world, I would visit foreign libraries…just because. Sendai Mediatheque would definitely be on my list. It’s so beautiful! (image source 1) (image source 2). 

4. Central Library, San Diego Public Library, San Diego, California, USA

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This library is about a year old (I think). It’s either a rebuilt/remodel or just a newly built library in San Diego, CA. My sister visited and she said she had a blast. I want to go to! (image source). 

5. Bibliotheca Alexandrina (The New Library of Alexandria), Alexandria, Egypt

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I don’t think I need to explain how cool it would be to visit this library…(image source). 

There it is friends! These are my top pics (for today…). I really wanted to just concentrate on American libraries, but I couldn’t help myself. I’m sorry! But all these libraries are beautiful and have their merits. 

So, what about you? Do you have some dream library destinations?

Sneaky Plotting Problems: The Top 10 Countdown

bookgeekconfessions:

Tips by Alicia Rasley

Originally Posted on AliciaRasley.com

image

Problem #10: Backstory Blunders

The past is prologue, for sure, but you can tell too much too soon dragging your plot down, if everything about the characters’ past is explained right upfront in Chapter One.

Problem # 9: Boring Beginnings

If you have to rely on your readers’ patience while you get the story set up, you’re likely to lose most of them.

Start where the protagonist’s problem starts, or just before that, and feed in the backstory later. This is the MTV era– people don’t like to wait.

Be especially wary of books that start with the protagonist on a journey, thinking about what awaits her at the destination. Editors frequently mention that as an example of a boring opening. It helps to decide what your major story questions are and make sure those are posed in the first few chapters– at least one should be posed in Chapter One.

Problem #8: Limping to a Conclusion

You don’t want the reader to think you ended the book just because you ran out of paper. Make the ending a conclusive one, reinforcing the themes of the book and the progress of the protagonist. (Click here for more discussion of this topic.)

Problem # 7: Sagging Middle

The middle has to do more than just fill up the space between beginning and end. It should be a time of “rising conflict” where the protagonist is tested up to (and perhaps beyond) the limits of his ability– a time to develop the internal and external conflicts and show how they influence the protagonist’s actions. It should set up the great crisis/climax/resolution that will bring the novel to a close.

So when you’re starting the middle, think of how the protagonist can be challenged. What external plot events can make his internal conflict impossible to ignore any longer? How can that internal conflict impede his/her progress towards the goal? If there’s an antagonist, how does the antagonist’s reaction affect the protagonist’s progress?

Read More

diversityinya:

A Diverse Dozen

Looking for some YA books that just happen to have characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters? Here’s a diverse dozen titles with something for every reader — contemporary, fantasy, science fiction, and mystery too. (Descriptions are from WorldCat.)

Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac (Tu Books) — In a world that has barely survived an apocalypse that leaves it with pre-twentieth century technology, Lozen is a monster hunter for four tyrants who are holding her family hostage.

Pointe by Brandy Colbert (Putnam) — Four years after Theo’s best friend, Donovan, disappeared at age thirteen, he is found and brought home and Theo puts her health at risk as she decides whether to tell the truth about the abductor, knowing her revelation could end her life-long dream of becoming a professional ballet dancer.

If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth (Arthur A. Levine Books) — Seventh-grader Lewis “Shoe” Blake from the Tuscarora Reservation has a new friend, George Haddonfield from the local Air Force base, but in 1975 upstate New York there is a lot of tension and hatred between Native Americans and Whites–and Lewis is not sure that he can rely on friendship.

Fake ID by Lamar Giles (Amistad) — “An African-American teen in the Witness Protection Program moves to a new town and finds himself trying to solve a murder mystery when his first friend is found dead.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han (Simon & Schuster) — Lara Jean writes love letters to all the boys she has loved and then hides them in a hatbox until one day those letters are accidentally sent.

Pantomime by Laura Lam (Strange Chemistry) — Gene, the daughter of a noble family, runs away from the decadence of court to R.H. Ragona’s circus of magic, where she meets runaway Micah, whose blood could unlock the mysteries of the world of Ellada.

Summer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe Garcia McCall (Tu Books) — In an adventure reminiscent of Homer’s Odyssey, fifteen-year-old Odilia and her four younger sisters embark on a journey to return a dead man to his family in Mexico, aided by La Llorona, but impeded by a witch, a warlock, chupacabras, and more.

Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina (Candlewick) — One morning before school, some girl tells Piddy Sanchez that Yaqui Delgado hates her and wants to kick her ass. Piddy doesn’t even know who Yaqui is, never mind what she’s done to piss her off. Word is that Yaqui thinks Piddy is stuck-up, shakes her stuff when she walks, and isn’t Latin enough with her white skin, good grades, and no accent. And Yaqui isn’t kidding around, so Piddy better watch her back. At first Piddy is more concerned with trying to find out more about the father she’s never met and how to balance honors courses with her weekend job at the neighborhood hair salon. But as the harassment escalates, avoiding Yaqui and her gang starts to take over Piddy’s life. Is there any way for Piddy to survive without closing herself off or running away?

Rogue by Lyn Miller-Lachmann (Nancy Paulsen Books) — An eighth-grade girl with Asperger’s syndrome tries to befriend her new neighbor, facing many challenges along the way.

More Than This by Patrick Ness (Candlewick) — A boy named Seth drowns, losing his life as the pounding sea claims him. But then he wakes. He is naked, thirsty, starving. But alive. How is that possible? He remembers dying. So how is he here? And where is this place? It looks like the suburban English town where he lived as a child, before an unthinkable tragedy happened and his family moved to America. But the neighborhood around his old house is overgrown, covered in dust, and completely abandoned. What’s going on? And why is it that whenever he closes his eyes, he falls prey to vivid, agonizing memories that seem more real than the world around him? Seth begins a search for answers, hoping that he might not be alone, trapped in a crumbling, abandoned world.

Prophecy by Ellen Oh (HarperTeen) —A demon slayer, the only female warrior in the King’s army, must battle demon soldiers, an evil shaman, and the Demon Lord to find the lost ruby of the Dragon King’s prophecy and save her kingdom.

Far From You by Tess Sharpe (Hyperion) — After Sophie Winters survives a brutal attack in which her best friend, Mina, is murdered, she sets out to find the killer. At the same time she must prove she is free of her past Oxy addiction and in no way to blame for Mina’s death.

craighead:

christinegro:

garnnetea:

this is amazing. 
#potterhead forever.

This is tripping me out..

The longer you stare the weirder it gets lol

craighead:

christinegro:

garnnetea:

this is amazing. 

#potterhead forever.

This is tripping me out..

The longer you stare the weirder it gets lol

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