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Title: Shiver

Author: Maggie Stiefvater

Goodreads || 

Rating: 2.5/5

When Grace was a child she was taken from her backyard and dragged into the woods behind her house by a pack of wolves. Ever since then, she’s been fascinated by the wolves and one wolf in particular.

Shiver follows the perspectives of Grace and shapeshifter Sam, two teens whose lives are connected because of the wolves.

This book is very much character driven and about the relationship Grace and Sam foster between each other. However, this story is slow and almost unimaginative.

I had high hopes for this novel. I honestly that it was a good book. It has its positives and it also has its faults. What I do know is - if you’re a fan of paranormal romances, you’ll probably like it.

That’s why I assumed I’d like it too, but I didn’t. The “plot” was intermittent with too many extraneous details that didn’t make sense for this book. Since Shiver is the first book in a trilogy I only assume those details would be of use in the last two books.

The writing style, alternating perspectives, was fun. I’ve noticed that’s pretty common in YA books and I like it. The books read well when alternating pov’s work. But, the voice sounded awkward.

Shiver deals very much about keeping Sam human. He’s one of the wolves that live in the woods, but he doesn’t feel right being a wolf. This book relies heavily on Grace and Sam’s relationship, however, Stiefvater fails to make me actually care about the characters, especially since this is a very character driven novel.

Grace was annoying and seemed flaky. Sam sounded to perfect. Both of them didn’t seem so concerned about the things happening around them (even though they mention multiple times that they have to do something about it.) They were slow to respond to the “crisis” at hand and that was annoying.

Their relationship (the whole point behind the book) just seemed to random and spontaneous. Yes, they had a strong attachment to each other, but it just seems forced.

I do commend the shapeshifting. The whole wolf and human transformation theory and such is interesting and I’ve never read that anywhere before.

Although, I didn’t like the whole of the book I did like the ending. It was satisfying enough. If Shiver was a stand alone novel, that would have been great. Unfortunately, I don’t see myself reading the rest of the series.

You’ll like if interested in: romance, paranormal, shapeshifters/werewolves

shiver maggie stiefvater book review the book blog: 2014 edition young adult fiction

mrpness:

theknifeofneverlettinggo:

yer-nothing:


page eighty / the knife of never letting go

I don’t think we can pin any one denomination on the settlers, but all of this seems really Catholic. Source: Ex-Catholic here.
Plus, they mention a monastery (aka, the future Office of the Ask) which made (far too much) communion wine. So, lots of Catholic elements.
I’ve always seen them as being a weird Baptist-Catholic-Old Testament/Jewish hybrid religion. Not that I have any evidence for it, other than the Catholic stuff. Tho, they do have the whole Bar/Bat Mitzvah thing (you ain’t had a Bar Mitzvah ‘til you had a Prentisstown Bar Mitzvah!), which could point to the re-introduction of some Old Testament business*. Plus, I don’t care what anyone says, I see these folks as being Appalachian/Ozark/General Southerner types, so Baptist shenanigans and maybe some snake handling why not.
*Did I spend way too long yesterday wondering if the 1st Wave settlers practice circumcision? Yes, yes I did. 

yeah my first thought was that they were catholic hmm
and I could imagine that since it’s the future, that maybe religions have blended a bit together, thus perhaps hybrid stuff
or maybe they were new sect and this was part of the reason they left they old world? reminiscent of the europeans that went to the americas bc they wanted their religion freedom

*Bursts through the door* OH ARE WE TALKING ABOUT RELIGION?
Well, Patrick Ness was raised American Christian, though I can’t recall if I’ve heard what denomination. The faith of the settlers does not directly resemble any current religion, but the language and acts suggest it is a hybrid of some Abrahamic faiths. The blood and sacrifice of participants seems to be central, at least for Aaron and the others from Prentisstown.
I’m trying to recall, but I’m thinking that after Aaron in the first book, no other characters really talk about religion as being a motivation, and all of the churches we see are either abandoned or converted into another use. Each book climaxes with a scene of violence occurring in an empty church building.

mrpness:

theknifeofneverlettinggo:

yer-nothing:

page eighty / the knife of never letting go

I don’t think we can pin any one denomination on the settlers, but all of this seems really Catholic. Source: Ex-Catholic here.

Plus, they mention a monastery (aka, the future Office of the Ask) which made (far too much) communion wine. So, lots of Catholic elements.

I’ve always seen them as being a weird Baptist-Catholic-Old Testament/Jewish hybrid religion. Not that I have any evidence for it, other than the Catholic stuff. Tho, they do have the whole Bar/Bat Mitzvah thing (you ain’t had a Bar Mitzvah ‘til you had a Prentisstown Bar Mitzvah!), which could point to the re-introduction of some Old Testament business*. Plus, I don’t care what anyone says, I see these folks as being Appalachian/Ozark/General Southerner types, so Baptist shenanigans and maybe some snake handling why not.

*Did I spend way too long yesterday wondering if the 1st Wave settlers practice circumcision? Yes, yes I did. 

yeah my first thought was that they were catholic hmm

and I could imagine that since it’s the future, that maybe religions have blended a bit together, thus perhaps hybrid stuff

or maybe they were new sect and this was part of the reason they left they old world? reminiscent of the europeans that went to the americas bc they wanted their religion freedom

*Bursts through the door* OH ARE WE TALKING ABOUT RELIGION?

Well, Patrick Ness was raised American Christian, though I can’t recall if I’ve heard what denomination. The faith of the settlers does not directly resemble any current religion, but the language and acts suggest it is a hybrid of some Abrahamic faiths. The blood and sacrifice of participants seems to be central, at least for Aaron and the others from Prentisstown.

I’m trying to recall, but I’m thinking that after Aaron in the first book, no other characters really talk about religion as being a motivation, and all of the churches we see are either abandoned or converted into another use. Each book climaxes with a scene of violence occurring in an empty church building.

(via theknifeofneverlettinggo)

chaos walking


"I think I’d most like to spend a day with Harry. I’d take him out for a meal and apologize for everything I’ve put him through." J.K Rowling. 
Happy Birthday, Jo! Thank you for existing and creating the amazing world all of us love and will cherish forever! (July 31st, 1965)

"I think I’d most like to spend a day with Harry. I’d take him out for a meal and apologize for everything I’ve put him through." J.K Rowling. 

Happy Birthday, Jo! Thank you for existing and creating the amazing world all of us love and will cherish forever! (July 31st, 1965)

(Source: rowlinginthedepp, via the-rusty-typewritter94)

Harry Potter J.K. Rowling


Summer Book Photo Challenge

Where I’m Reading Wednesday: In my room in between toys (from the munchkin), frequent dog kisses, and divided attention (coming from tumblr and snack breaks). 

Summer Book Photo Challenge

Where I’m Reading Wednesday: In my room in between toys (from the munchkin), frequent dog kisses, and divided attention (coming from tumblr and snack breaks). 

summer book photo challenge mine

findinghomeinabook:

Hi! So the book blog community is probably waaaay huger than I think, and I’ve yet to meet a bunch of you lovely people so if you’re a book blog or post bookish things could you reblog this so I can follow you and we can talk about our favorite books and writing advice together and be best friends? Because that would be amazing

(via write-me-jessica)

Anonymous asked:

What stereotypes/tropes of female characters would you like to see broken in the YA genre?

Where's My Bookmark? Answer:

thewritingcafe:

1) The extremely ordinary girl who is average, plain, and bland in appearance, personality, and general character development and who constantly talks about how boring she is and how there’s nothing special about her. This character is boring. This character is flat and static. The plot throws her around and everyone else figures things out for her. What she does do is make one or two very asinine decisions. Authors often use that as an opportunity to let a male love interest step in and fix everything for her. She then moves on from the mistake without having learned or without having changed from the experience.

Your characters, especially your protagonists and main characters, deserve so much more than that.

I should say that characters who genuinely believe there is nothing special about them do not fall into this. The characters who don’t genuinely believe it are the ones who mention it in a nonchalant way when they’re confused as to why someone would like them romantically and who then never mention it again. This belief is not shown in their dialogue, their emotions, or their behavior. They never express their concerns and no one else notices that they have low self esteem.

2) Female characters who are tokens. They’re introduced as the Strong Female Character, or what authors think a strong female character is, and do nothing but nag to show that women are always right and men are always wrong. They contribute nothing to the plot, are not well written, and rarely have relationships with other female characters.

3) The evil ex girlfriend needs to go or at least get an upgrade. She often shows up with the first character I described. She’s the ex girlfriend of the hot guy who is in love with the super average girl and she’s often the opposite of the protagonist. The protagonist is kind, gentle, innocent, and pure. The evil ex girlfriend is rude, dresses provocatively, hates the protagonist, and is an antagonist. This author gives all traits they consider immoral to this character and they’re used as a tool for preaching.

There are a lot of things wrong with this character, including sexism, blatant “white and black” morality, the “virgin vs whore” symbolism, and general craft failure. I think the only well written version of this character I’ve seen is Regina George (prior to Janis’s plans to mess with her).

Another version of this character is the “crazy ex” who stalks the male love interest and who is often referred to as being insane or mentally ill. These characters are less common in the YA age group though.

4) Female characters who are only love interests. These characters can be taken out of the story without losing anything important to the plot or characterization. This is craft failure.

5) We need to stop “fridging” female characters. This is when a female character is killed off by the bad guys for the purpose of angering the male protagonist. The death most often happens in the beginning of the story or shortly before the story begins. This trope is used way too often.

6) Female characters who are used to show that femininity or being attractive is inherently bad and that it makes other characters like that bad people. These characters often complain about other female characters and prefer to hang with the boys because they’re “not complicated” or something.

7) This next character isn’t one that we need to get rid of, but one that needs to allow others to take the role of the protagonist. I see so many times in fiction, particularly in speculative fiction, that female protagonists need some unique skill or ability to be the protagonist. Male characters get to be the unlikely hero who comes from humble beginnings just as much as they get to be someone with a unique ability. Female characters don’t get that chance too often.

writing